Tags: access, calculate, database, dividing, excel, function, microsoft, mod, mysql, number, oracle, query, remainder, sql

Using a Mod Function in an Access query

On Database » Microsoft Access

4,780 words with 2 Comments; publish: Mon, 26 May 2008 18:51:00 GMT; (25078.13, « »)

I am trying to calculate the remainder of a number after dividing by 12 e.g.

26/12 = 2 remainder 2. To do this in Excel is easy using the Mod Function

but I cant seam to find the Mod function or similar in Access. Can any one

help me out with how to do this in Access?

Thanks

All Comments

Leave a comment...

  • 2 Comments
    • On Wed, 2 Jun 2004 17:49:00 +0100, Ant wrote:

      > I am trying to calculate the remainder of a number after dividing by 12 e.g.

      > 26/12 = 2 remainder 2. To do this in Excel is easy using the Mod Function

      > but I cant seam to find the Mod function or similar in Access. Can any one

      > help me out with how to do this in Access?

      > Thanks

      Would you believe .....

      Exp:[FieldName] Mod 12

      To find help on Functions, first open any VBA code window.

      Click Help.

      Selet the Index tab.

      Type

      Functions

      click Search

      Select the function from the list.

      or....

      Type

      Mod

      place the cursor within the word.

      Click F1

      Fred

      Please only reply to this newsgroup.

      I do not reply to personal email.

      #1; Mon, 26 May 2008 18:52:00 GMT
    • "fredg" <fgutkind.ms-access.questionfor.info.example.invalid> wrote in message

      news:yjr9rvhuwwyo.1hvoypfm0axkk$.dlg.ms-access.questionfor.info.40tude.net... [vbcol=seagreen]

      > On Wed, 2 Jun 2004 17:49:00 +0100, Ant wrote:

      e.g.[vbcol=seagreen]

      Function[vbcol=seagreen]

      one

      > Would you believe .....

      > Exp:[FieldName] Mod 12

      > To find help on Functions, first open any VBA code window.

      > Click Help.

      > Selet the Index tab.

      > Type

      > Functions

      > click Search

      > Select the function from the list.

      > or....

      > Type

      > Mod

      > place the cursor within the word.

      > Click F1

      > --

      > Fred

      > Please only reply to this newsgroup.

      > I do not reply to personal email.

      ACESSING CHAT CHANNELS

      In additional to having IRC "client" software, you also must connect with an

      IRC server to participate in Internet chat. The IRC server is the equivalent

      of an online service chat forum; it carries information between IRC

      participants. Most IRC programs provide lists of IRC servers from which you

      can choose. To log onto the server, select it from the list and connect by

      using the command provided in the dialog box that contains the list.

      With Visual IRC, you're given a list of IRC servers that act as centralized

      relay points for all the messages that people send one another. You log on

      to one of these servers (if you find an open slot, that is), then accquire

      from the sever its current list of channels. this list could number from 12

      to 5,000 depending on the sever. While you're online with the server, your

      user name is visible to the users; so someone could query you personally,

      say hi, then if you respond, you've established a private channel just

      between you and the sender. You can also join an established channel, whose

      name by protocol begins with a pound sign (3) - for example,#COLORADO.

      After you've joined the persistent channel, Visual IRC pulls up a

      separatewindow containing the onging transcript of the sicussion in

      progresss. You have a text box with a blinking cursor that works somewhat

      like a command prompt; whatever you type there, after you press Enter, is

      echoed to the group. YOu can send commands to the IRC server itself by

      prefixing your command with a forward slash (/). This way, you can ask the

      server for a list of who is in this group, or who else is logged onto the

      server.

      Netscape, to it's credit, recognizes that internet users have good reasons

      to chat with one another outside of normal chat channels. The Netscape

      Conference tool, part of its Communicators 4.0 package is designed to work

      more like a global intercom console. You place a call to someone using his

      e-mail address as a reference. If that other answers the call, then you have

      a chat seeeion in progress, and either of you can call others (who also have

      Netscape Conferece) to join in.

      Once the Conference sessioin is established, you can use the program's tools

      to send information other than text. There's also a whiteboard, which acts

      as a collective Paintbrush screen. Any or all of the coference participants

      can use the scteen to draw diagrams, or to import exiting presentation

      graphics as though it were a projection screen. You can also transfer files

      over the session to all of the participants simultaneuosly.

      When the Conference session is closed, the "circuit" is terminated. So you

      don't have to worry about your conversation being listened to (ot joined by)

      other people on the internet.

      #2; Mon, 26 May 2008 18:53:00 GMT